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Complaint Handling Process – Informal

Complaint Handling Process – Informal

 

Characteristics of less serious complaints include behaviour or decisions that are:

  • Out of character for that person
  • One-off
  • Not entrenched
  • Low risk of harm/impact on other people

 

Examples of less serious issues:

  • Favouritism in team selections
  • Mild coarse language, yelling
  • Excessive emphasis on winning
  • Restriction of access to facilities

 

Relevant options for resolving serious complaints could be:

  1. Provide more information to the person complaining
  2. Suggest person complaining talks directly with person complained about
  3. An Olympic FC-nominated Committee member meets with person complained about
  4. Informal discussion with all those involved

 

Option 1: Provide more information to person complaining

 

This option is suitable when:

  • There are clear guidelines available and it appears to be a lack of awareness of these
  • The person complaining is seeking greater understanding
  • The complaint is in the early stages of the process.

 

Steps to follow:

  • Provide person with copy of Olympic FC’s Member Protection Policy, Code of Conduct and/or Coach/Spectator Code of Behaviour or selection policy.
  • Explain how these policies relate to the issue/concern

Option 2: Person complaining talks with person being complained about

 

This option is suitable when:

  • The person complaining requests this
  • The complaint is in the early stages of the process
  • The focus of the person complaining is to move forward rather than lay blame
  • There isn’t a significant power imbalance
  • The person complaining is confident or isn’t concerned about victimisation
  • The club can protect the person complaining
  • There is little emotion involved.

 

 

Steps to follow:

  • Consider suggesting to the person complaining that they:
  • Be sensitive about when and where the talk takes place (don’t do it in front of other parents or the team)
  • Avoid being emotional and don’t personalise concerns. Provide clear examples.
  • Focus on the solution rather than the problem – how to move forward
  • Take responsibility to help move forward

 

Option 3: You meet with person complained about

 

This option is suitable when:

  • The problem can be resolved by clarifying your club’s policies or guidelines
  • There is a power imbalance between the parties
  • You have observed the behaviour yourself
  • The person complaining requests this options

 

Steps to follow:

  • Find a time to talk privately with the person being complained about
  • Let them know that concerns have been expressed but try not to make the discussion personal (e.g. rather than say someone is biased, say there are concerns that children aren’t not getting equal time in the game)
  • Acknowledge their contribution to the club and discuss policies or guidelines that help clarify the issue
  • Ask for their perspective
  • Ask for their ideas on how to sort the issue
  • Check what further support might help them in their role
  • Get back to the person complaining with the outcome and monitor the situation.